“Yaba” Dabba Don't: A New Drug to Watch Out For - Banyan Stuart

“Yaba” Dabba Don’t: A New Drug to Watch Out For

A New Drug to Watch Out For
 

Hundreds and thousands of people in Bangladesh and Thailand have become hooked on the drug “Yaba,” which means “crazy medicine” in Thai.

Also known as the “madness drug,” Yaba is mainly produced in Southeast and East Asia. It’s most popular in Asian communities in the United States. Because the drug is a combination of stimulants, it’s commonly used in social and party settings like clubs, raves, and music festivals. But what is the Yaba drug? Our Stuart rehab is updating you on a new drug to watch out for.


What Is Yaba?

Yaba is a combination of methamphetamine and caffeine. Methamphetamine is a powerful and addictive central nervous system stimulant that’s derived from amphetamine. Due to its high potential for abuse and addiction, meth is illegal to sell, purchase, or use in the U.S. Caffeine is a natural stimulant that’s found in tea, coffee, some sodas, and cacao plants. As a mild stimulant, caffeine works by stimulating the central nervous system to produce alertness and increase energy. However, while it’s not as addictive or dangerous as meth, caffeine is also addictive in its own way. Avid caffeine drinkers who don’t get their daily dose may experience migraines and fatigue.

The term “Yaba” is Thai for “crazy medicine.” The drug was originally made in Southeast and East Asia and is mostly used in countries like Thailand and Bangladesh. But what does Yaba look like? Yaba pills are usually no larger than pencil erasers and are normally brightly colored reddish-orange or green. Yaba tablets also usually bear different logos, with letters “R” and “WY” being the most common. Some of these tablets even taste like candy and may come in grape, orange, or vanilla flavors.

Meth users and club drug users are more likely to begin using Yaba because these drugs are all similar. If you’re currently struggling with a meth addiction, we can help you avoid these additional complications. Banyan Stuart offers a medically monitored detox that can help you slowly and safely wean off meth so you can quit and regain your health.


How to Use Yaba

Yaba pills are usually taken orally but can also be taken using a method called “chasing the dragon.” This method involves placing the Yaba pill on aluminum foil and heating it from below. As the pill or tablet melts, the user inhales the rising vapors. Yaba can also be taken by crushing the tablets into a powder that can be snorted, mixed into a solvent, or injected. Although it’s difficult to determine the scope or prevalence of Yaba use in the U.S., authorities believe that the pills are brightly colored and flavored to appeal to younger crowds. Because this drug increases alertness and energy, it’s also common in clubs and raves, which are largely frequented by young adults.

Although Yaba originates in Asia, it’s spread into the U.S., especially in Northern California and Los Angeles. As previously mentioned, it’s also become more popular at raves, techno parties, clubs, and music festivals where the drug MDMA (ecstasy or Molly) is typically used. Yaba drug distributors deliberately market to young people, many of whom have already tried Molly or other club drugs.


Yaba Drug Effects

Yaba ingredients mainly include methamphetamine and caffeine, both of which are central nervous system stimulants. Of the two, meth is the most harmful because it can not only increase energy and alertness but can also elevate blood pressure and heart rate, among other side effects. This drug is responsible for most Yaba drug symptoms.

Some common side effects of Yaba drug use include:

  • Increased or rapid heart rate
  • Increased energy and alertness
  • Rapid breathing
  • Excessive sweating
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Increased risk of stroke and heart attack

Yaba can also damage small blood vessels in the brain, leading to stroke. Chronic use of Yaba can cause inflammation of the heart lining, resulting in cardiovascular disease and failure. Because the drug contains meth, taking large doses can also lead to overdose. Yaba overdose symptoms include hyperthermia (elevated body temperature), convulsions, stroke, heart attack, and death. People who abuse Yaba may also suffer from violent and aggressive behavior, paranoia, anxiety, confusion, and insomnia. Moreover, although most users administer Yaba orally, those who inject it expose themselves to additional risks, such as contracting HIV/AIDS or hepatitis B and C from using dirty syringes or sharing them with others.

Unfortunately, because the dose of meth in these pills is unknown, there’s no way to gauge the risk of overdose. Currently, Yaba is illegal in the U.S. because it contains methamphetamine, which is a Schedule II substance. Long-term meth users can develop severe physical dependence and addiction to the drug. Because Yaba contains meth, it’s safe to say that Yaba users are also at risk of developing an addiction that facilitates the support of a meth rehab.


Banyan Treatment Centers Stuart is here to help people who are addicted to drugs and want to change their lives. If you or someone you know is battling meth addiction or any other kind of substance use disorder, call us today at 888-280-4763 for more information about our Florida drug and alcohol treatment


Related Readings:

  • How Meth Is Made
  • Difference Between Amphetamine and Methamphetamine
Alyssa
Alyssa
Alyssa is Banyan’s Director of Digital Marketing & Technology. After overcoming her own struggles with addiction, she began working in the treatment field in 2012. She graduated from Palm Beach State College in 2016 with additional education in Salesforce University programs. A part of the Banyan team since 2016, Alyssa brings over 5 years of experience in the addiction treatment field.