Every day the news flashes stories about the opioid epidemic in the United States and the dangerous grip that opioids have on many American people.

From fentanyl to prescription painkillers, heartbreaking stories of overdoses never seem to end, and government officials scramble to find solutions.

As a Treasure Coast rehab center, we have seen the damages done by opioid firsthand, but it is not the only cause for concern. While opioids have risen to fame for good reason, it is not the only abused drugs that people need to be aware of. Overshadowed by the opioid epidemic, meth use is on the rise in the United States and causing serious problems.

The Rise in Meth Use in the United States

Although the focus may be on the opioid crisis, methamphetamine use is not to be ignored. Along with being a highly addictive substance, the health effects of meth use can be serious. Meth can be damaging to both the mental and physical health of the user, including unsightly changes in physical appearance. If left untreated, these problems could get worse and even become life-threatening. Not to mention the fact that meth addiction can also lead to related secondary issues for the addict and their loved ones.

While many people may be focused on combating the opioid epidemic, something needs to be done about meth in the United States as well to prevent more people from having to deal with these problems. In 2017, an estimated 964,000 Americans had a meth use disorder compared to just 684,000 people in 2016.1 These numbers show that over the course of a single year, the number of people addicted to meth increased by several hundred thousand. Other data follows this same trend with one showing that the number of meth seizures by authorities increased by 142% from 2017 to 2018 alone.2 Not only are more people addicted, but more meth is being circulated across the county.

Such steep jumps in a year’s time are cause for concern, but there are other bigger issues related to the increased meth use in the United States. More and more people are overdosing on this substance as well. It was found that from 2007 to 2017, the number of overdose deaths that involved methamphetamine was 7.5 times greater.3 While most overdoses now involve an opioid, meth overdoses are not far behind. Unfortunately, while meth use and overdose deaths are rising, the number of people getting help for this addiction is not rising at the same rate. In 2006, primary meth admissions were at 8% of all treatment admission, but in 2016 this number only rose to 11%.4 If the rise in meth use in the United States continues and people do not undergo meth detox and treatment, these numbers could get worse.

As a residential addiction treatment center in Stuart, we know that overcoming addiction isn’t easy, but it is possible. Opioids may always be in the news, but there are plenty of other abused substances that people are struggling to overcome on their own. With our help, you or your loved one could stop abusing drugs and start building a foundation for a better life.



Call us today at 888-280-4763 to take the first step to recovery.


Sources:

  1. NIH - What is the scope of methamphetamine misuse in the United States?
  2. NPR - Seizures Of Methamphetamine Are Surging In The U.S.
  3. NDEWS - Methamphetamine A Regional Drug Crisis
  4. TEDS - Treatment Episode Data Set 2016
 

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Alyssa
Alyssa
Alyssa is Banyan’s Director of Digital Marketing & Technology. After overcoming her own struggles with addiction, she began working in the treatment field in 2012. She graduated from Palm Beach State College in 2016 with additional education in Salesforce University programs. A part of the Banyan team since 2016, Alyssa brings over 5 years of experience in the addiction treatment field.